1. […] di essere menzionati non tanto per il progetto in se, quanto per la presentazione. Il primo è Safetynet City, dove al posto di utilizzare le classiche foto che avete visto finora, gli autori hanno ben pensato […]

  2. Mike says:

    Have you guys seen the 2012 Foster + Partners Prize winner’s project?



    • Ha! If we are to be humble, we would say that it is likely Yvonne never saw our project. If we are to be egotistic, we would say that it is clear she was inspired by our work. Which should we be!?

  3. ipawnz says:

    That was very entertaining😀

  4. […] Halloween and we decided to have some fun and show you Mihaly Slocombe Architects submission to the 2011 Zombie Safe House Competition.  These two young designers from North Melbourne, Australia took a creative approach to the […]

  5. charlie says:

    You have my vote. Simple but great idea and of corse perfect presentation. If we will have zombie attack I would like to live in such a place😀

  6. Turai-Ossa39 says:

    Probably not the most practical design (it’s still a pretty cool idea though) and the art and description are fantastic.

    • Practical? Er, this is a competition for a zombie safehouse… Obviously, SafetyNet city is a government initiative, prepared in secret by a little-known global task force. Our race’s ongoing survival is our highest priority!

  7. Seraph says:

    interesting concept, but as Azaroth said, it’s too impractical. if you had all that time and resources to create nets, you might as well have just secured a few blocks of skyscrapers.

    • Thank you for your comments, Seraph and Turai-Ossa39.

      When considering any zombie safehouse solution, longterm safety should be a high priority. The safehouse must provide a way for its inhabitants to defend themselves as well as sufficient space for them to live, collect water and grow food sustainably over many years. It’s no good if the solution relies on canned food – eventually the cans would run out and the human population would starve to death.

      The population capacity of the safehouse is also critical – how could you hope to repopulate the planet from a group of 10 people? Or 100? SafetyNet City can accommodate a population of 10,000 – more than enough genetic diversity with which to ensure the survival of our species.

      We don’t think our proposal is impractical, we think it’s sustainable, expandable and necessary.

  8. This is a highly intelligent response to the problem, and well presented. The only real issue I see is that the length of time and resources it takes to create such a construct would exceed the time available wherein ones construction crew is unmolested by zombies. Steel cabling isnt sitting around waiting to be harvested at those lengths, unless you count bridge support wiring which isnt exactly accessible.

    • Thank you for the positive comments and the constructive criticism, Azaroth.

      We imagine that the construction of SafetyNet City would be an incremental process, starting with a few nets and a couple of pods, possibly constructed from less durable materials than steel cable, structural timber etc. Over time, these nets would be joined by more and, much like the growth of any city, the newer areas would be safer and more durable thanks to access to better construction materials.

      This would hardly be a straightforward process – carting spools of cable from manufacturing plants, packs of timber from hardware stores and assembling everything using portable electricity generators would be no mean feat.

      The best things in life are never easy.

  9. Paul says:

    Ii Only see one flaw that can’t be helped…Enough zombies pile up at the bottom of a safety net then all they have to do is walk up the mound of zombie bodies to reach one of the safety net enclaves……it would take few millions of zombie bodies to do that……take NYC …..reduce the population by 13.999 million to your supposed pop of 10 grand and thats a lot of zombie bodies piling up,…….anough to wipe out a good portion of the safety net city.

    • That’s a fair criticism, Paul.

      However, let’s do the maths: a nominal skyscraper has a height of 60 storeys or 180m. Subtracting the height of the net and living pod leaves you with, say, 150m. Assuming a 45 degree angle of repose, a 150m high pile of zombies will be 300m wide at its base. With an average New York street width of 20m, the volume of this zombie corpse pile would be 450,000cbm. If a zombie is 1.7m tall, 500mm wide and 250mm thick from front to back, its volume is 0.21cbm. So, to fill the zombie pile, you would need to kill 2.1million zombies, all along a single street.

      To further bolster our argument, let’s also take into consideration decomposition. A normal human corpse decomposes in the open air within a year. A zombie corpse is likely to do so even more rapidly since its body is already rotting, let’s say within 6 months. Assuming the bones of a zombie represent 20% of its body volume, unless you can kill 2.1million zombies in under 6 months, you will need to kill 10.5million in order to create a zombie bone pile that’s 150m high.

      2.1million zombies in 6 months is 350,000 zombies a month, approximately 87,500 zombies a week or 12,500 zombies a day.

      SafetyNet City may be on the smelly side, but we think we’ll be pretty safe.

  10. laurence says:

    lovely presentation, hope little johnny comes back to dinner…soon…

  11. Z1006 says:

    Beautiful Presentation!! Did you thought in starting your own zombies stories?
    deserve my vote!🙂

  12. Roger Cooper says:

    Great drawings mate.. like your style!

  13. Ross says:

    The romantic imagery is off the scale.

    Definition of the nature of your zombie problem is a welcome framework to begin forming a solution.

    Enjoyed immensely!!

  14. mycomo says:

    Great illustrations!! Good luck:)

  15. Trevor says:

    Nice work Mihaly Slocombe! The last three pages are particularly great.

  16. Morgan says:

    Brilliant artwork!

  17. […] entries for the 2011 Zombie Safehouse Competition are now online. If you like our submission (entry #1251), please visit our page and give us the thumbs up. Dear readers, feel free to leave a comment […]

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